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Test Code LENT Enterovirus, Molecular Detection, PCR

Reporting Name

Enterovirus PCR

Useful For

Aids in diagnosing enterovirus infections

Performing Laboratory

Mayo Medical Laboratories in Rochester

Specimen Type

Varies


Specimen Required


Submit a raw clinical sample (not a culture isolate) for enterovirus PCR. This test will detect enterovirus, but will not differentiate viruses in this family or provide serotyping information.

 

Specimen source is required.

 

Submit only 1 of the following specimens:

 

Specimen Type: Body fluid

Sources: Pericardial, peritoneal, or pleural

Container/Tube: Sterile container

Specimen Volume: 0.5 mL

Collection Instructions: Do not centrifuge.

 

Specimen Type: Respiratory

Sources: Bronchial washing, bronchoalveolar lavage, nasopharyngeal aspirate, swab or washing, throat or nasal swab, sputum, or tracheal aspirate

Container/Tube: Sterile container

Specimen Volume: 1.5 mL

 

Specimen Type: Spinal fluid

Container/Tube: Sterile vial

Specimen Volume: 0.5 mL

Collection Instructions: Do not centrifuge.

 

Specimen Type: Swab

Sources: Dermal, eye, rectal, genital, nasopharyngeal, throat, nasal or urethral

Container/Tube: BBL CultureSwab (T092)

Specimen Volume: Entire specimen

Collection Instructions: Rectal swab must have no visible stool.


Specimen Minimum Volume

Body Fluid or Spinal Fluid: 0.3 mL/Respiratory Specimen: 1 mL

Specimen Stability Information

Specimen Type Temperature Time
Varies Refrigerated (preferred) 7 days
  Frozen  7 days

Reference Values

Negative

Day(s) and Time(s) Performed

Monday through Sunday; Varies

Test Classification

This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Clinic in a manner consistent with CLIA requirements. This test has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

CPT Code Information

87498

LOINC Code Information

Test ID Test Order Name Order LOINC Value
LENT Enterovirus PCR In Process

 

Result ID Test Result Name Result LOINC Value
SRC68 Specimen Source 31208-2
80066 Enterovirus PCR 29591-5

Clinical Information

Enteroviruses are positive-sense RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family. These viruses were initially classified by serotype as polioviruses (3 types), echoviruses (31 types, including types 22 and 23, which are now classified as parechoviruses), coxsackievirus A (23 types), and coxsackievirus B (6 types). However, genomic studies have demonstrated that there is significant overlap in the biological characteristics of different serotypes and more recently isolated enteroviruses are now named with consecutive numbers (eg, EV68, EV69).

 

The normal site of enterovirus replication is the gastrointestinal tract where the infection is typically subclinical. However, in a proportion of cases, the virus spreads to other organs, causing systemic manifestations, including mild respiratory disease (eg, the common cold); conjunctivitis; hand, foot, and mouth disease; aseptic meningitis; myocarditis; and acute flaccid paralysis. Collectively, enteroviruses are the most common cause of upper respiratory tract disease in children. In addition, the enteroviruses are the most common cause of central nervous system (CNS) disease; they account for almost all viruses recovered in culture from spinal fluid. Differentiation of enteroviruses from other viruses and bacteria that cause CNS disease is important for the appropriate medical management of these patients.

 

Traditional cell culture methods require 6 days, on average, for enterovirus detection. In comparison, real-time PCR allows same-day detection. Detection of enterovirus nucleic acid by PCR is also the most sensitive diagnostic method for the diagnosis of CNS infection caused by these viruses.

Interpretation

A positive result indicates the presence of enterovirus RNA in the specimen.

Clinical Reference

1. Enterovirus surveillance-United States, 1970-2005. MMWR Morbidity Mortality Weekly Report Sept 15 2006;55(SS08):1-20

2. Foray S, Pailloud F, Thouvenot D, et al: Evaluation of combining upper respiratory tract swab samples with cerebrospinal fluid examination for the diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis in children. J Med Virology 1999;57(2):193-197

3. Furione M, Zavattoni M, Gatti M, et al: Rapid detection of enteroviral RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with aseptic meningitis by reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction. New Microbiol 1998;21(4):343-351

Analytic Time

Same day/1 day

Reject Due To

Hemolysis

NA

Lipemia

NA

Icterus

NA

Other

Calcium alginate-tipped swab, wood swab, or transport swab containing gel

 

Method Name

Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)/RNA Probe Hybridization

Forms

If not ordering electronically, complete, print, and send a Microbiology Test Request Form (T244) with the specimen (http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/it-mmfiles/microbiology_test_request_form.pdf)